Workshops

APPLICATIONS IN PROGRAM R

Instructor for this workshop is Rob Lonsinger.

This workshop will consist of 2 sessions. The morning session (10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.) will be an Introduction to R Workshop and will include the following topics: R syntax (e.g., how to read and write R code, understanding types of variables and their uses, and how to reference data for analyses from complex data sets), data management (e.g., how to manipulate, merge, sort, and subset datasets), basic descriptive statistics (e.g., generated with key functions such as tapply and sapply), and R packages (e.g., finding, loading, and understanding the supporting documentation). The afternoon session (1:00 – 4:30 p.m.) will be an Intermediate R Workshop that will focus on the following topics: simulations and looping functions, using defined functions, and graphing. Those less familiar with R should plan on attending both sessions, but those who have some experience using R could consider skipping the morning session and join during lunch. Laptop computers are required for both sessions. Organizer: Janet Rachlow

EXPANDINGYOUR BROADER IMPACTS TO THE PREK-12 CLASSROOM: THE DO’S AND DONT’S FOR PROFESSIONAL MAMMALOGISTS

Panelists include: Bruce MacFadden, Pamela Owen, Laurie Schlitter, and Barbara Shaw.

This workshop will focus on ideas and the underlying PreK-12th grade research to support incorporating “Broader Impacts” into these classrooms with relevant, tangible ways to engage youth and their educators in your grant-supported work. In addition, we will examine the best delivery methods for the PreK-12th grade educators to support and enrich their classrooms with your cutting-edge research. We will address how to meet and exceed the academic standards-driven focus currently forced on our public educators as their students face the ineffective but demanded high-stakes standardized testing. Throughout the workshop, we will keep an eye on how to budget for the Broader Impacts in a climate of diminished funding for the necessary future and security of individual students as well as the world. Organizer: Barbara Shaw

HOW TO WRITE A SUCCESSFUL NSF DOCTORAL DISSERTATION IMPROVEMENT GRANT

Panelists include: Kayce Bell, Brett Pasch, and Mike Willig.

The National Science Foundation (NSF)’s Division of Environmental Biology (DEB) and Integrative Organismal Biology (IOB) offer Ph.D. candidates a great opportunity to apply for research money. Through its Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant (DDIG) program, NSF awards up to $15K (direct costs) for 24 months to students meeting eligibility requirements. Given the high rate of funding of DDIG’s by NSF standards (20-35% of proposals are funded) this is an excellent way for young researchers to begin a relationship with the NSF and ensure continued grant proposal success as well as excellent mammalian based research throughout their career. These grants provide partial support of doctoral dissertation research to improve the overall quality of the research project. Monies may be used to travel to specialized facilities or field research locations, use of specialized resekaycarch equipment, purchase of supplies and services not otherwise available, the hiring of field or laboratory assistants, fees for computerized or other forms of data, and rental of environmental chambers or other research facilities. This workshop will emphasize what makes a successful proposal citing specific examples that have led to success. While the workshop will focus on the DDIG, a student could pick up useful tips for writing any scientific grant proposal. Presentations will address topics such as the purpose of the DDIGs, tips for writing successful proposals, the review process for submitted proposals. Presentation will be followed by an extensive question and answer period. Organizers: Karen Munroe & Melissa Merrick